How Vitamin D changed my life

Disclaimer: Unlike iron deficiency anaemia, I was never diagnosed with Vitamin D deficiency but instead was prescribed vitamin D by my GP for a different reason, which so happened to heal my fatigue. I wanted to share my experience in the hopes that it might help others struggling with fatigue. If you think you might be deficient in vitamin D you should consult with your doctor.

In autumn 2015 I was prescribed calcium by my doctor to help protect my bones from osteoporosis. Unfortunately for me I made the mistake of not mentioning to my GP during consultation that I struggle to swallow almost any kind of tablet and that large tablets would be an impossibility for me – so when I opened my prescription and saw the bullet-size pills, I filed the tablets in a draw and ignored them for a few months.

As winter came round I got ill with a severe chest infection which required three separate rounds of antibiotics – the last ones strong antibiotics – and steroids to clear. By the time I recovered I had lost 10lbs and was feeling pretty run down. So I wasn’t too surprised that I felt exhausted. Over several weeks though my exhaustion did not improve with any amount of rest. Sleeping 12-14 hours a day had become the norm, along with struggling to wake up myself up – I started semi-waking, falling asleep, semi-waking, and then falling asleep again over and over before finally properly waking. I would lay for hours needing to go to the bathroom falling in and out of sleep because I couldn’t summon the energy to move.

I knew something wasn’t right. By this point I had already begun taking my iron deficiency more seriously and felt that there must be something else wrong to make me feel this tired. It also felt different from the kind of tiredness I get when I’m low on iron – when I’m low on iron I feel breathless, like my chest is being squeezed tight and all my muscles ache constantly – the general feeling is that you can’t get enough air, or enough blood pumping around your limbs, even though your heart is beating like crazy and you’re having palpitations.

This was more like a zombie, comatose feeling where I could barely rouse myself, I never felt truly awake, it was just like living in a permanent fog. I remember lying in my bed at this point feeling like it was an effort to hold my phone and even dropped it on a couple of occasions because it was ‘too heavy’.It’s hard to explain our put into words, but the two feel qualitatively different.

Since I was feeling pretty run down at this time I decided I would start taking better care of myself in general – including finding a more accessible form of the calcium I had been prescribed. As I was then living quite a distance from my GP I did some research online as to what other forms of calcium and vitamin D I could ask for that might be easier for me to take. Unfortunately my research came up with no suitable options available on prescription so instead I began looking at over the counter options I could potentially purchase myself. Luckily I found several options available at Boots.

I can’t remember how I dragged myself to the city centre and back, but somehow or another I did, and within a few days of taking my new calcium tablets, the foggy exhaustion which left me struggling to wake up – and stay awake – began to lift. Puzzled at why calcium would have that affect, having never heard of any link between calcium and fatigue, I did some research into what my doctor had prescribed which turned out to be calcium and vitamin D, and it was at this point that I found out about the symptoms of vitamin D deficiency. The constant fatigue, low immune system, muscle weakness, fogginess now made a lot more sense.

I spoke with my GP and asked if the dose and type of tablets I had gotten over the counter would be a suitable replacement for the prescription she had given me and she confirmed that they were and how many of them I should take to make up an equivalent dose. She also confirmed for me that there were no easier to take tablets available on the NHS and we therefore agreed that if I struggled to take the originals, the best thing to do would be for me to continue purchasing them on my own. We also discussed about the vitamin D and she agreed that if I found it helpful I should continue taking it.

I also did more research and found out that due to our location, around 98% of people living in my area of the country were vitamin D deficient in the winter since we are far too north on the earth’s latitude to produce any. I imagine the sheer cold even in summer leads to a majority of people covering up even in summer – I know I tried to put away my winter coat in late June, almost July and found myself regretting it. Also, contrary to my previous belief, milk in my country is not fortified with vitamin D. I had seen milk listed as being a source of vitamin D so often that I didn’t think I needed to worry about it at all.

From then on I made sure to take my calcium and vitamin D everyday, and my fatigue cleared and I began to feel more normal. I felt that I had found a piece of the puzzle in why my health was so poor. But after a while on the vitamin D I began to suffer from insomnia, at which point some further research revealed that I needed to take it in the morning rather than in the evening. Occasionally when I have been taking my vitamin D very frequently I will still get the insomnia but now I recognise it I taper down the vitamin D for a short while before continuing as normal. Such is life, we learn along the journey. Other than this minor hitch I haven’t had any other side-effects from taking the vitamin D, unless you count more energy and feeling more refreshed!

Looking back I also realise now I had some of the other symptoms of having low vitamin D levels that I had raised with my doctor, like bone pain in my legs which was unexplained. Although I’m fair skinned (Type I) I still had several risk factors – I was a student so I spent the majority of my time indoors; if I went abroad I wore factor 30 or 50 as I due to my skin type I am at high-risk for skin cancer; I had been living in the far north of the UK for several years now. We lived so far north that as a community we would joke we didn’t know what that weird shape was in the sky whenever the sun came out for it’s annual one-day visit.

The combination of iron and vitamin D has been a life-changer in terms of my fatigue, tiredness, breathlessness, aches, pains and bone pain. I only wish I had known about both sooner so that I hadn’t spent so much time exhausted and wondering how on earth I was going to make it through another day.

Since I found out about vitamin D the Scottish government has agreed with the Scientific Advisory Commission on Nutrition (SACN) to advise Scots to take a vitamin D supplement at least during the autumn and winter months, if not all year round. After feeling like a bit of a mad woman for talking about this with family and friends it’s good to know I’m not wrong! Hopefully this will also mean greater awareness for GPs when they have patients presenting with fatigue and aches and pains.

Do you take vitamin D? Or do you recognise that constant feeling of fatigue, aches and pains that doesn’t go away with rest? Share with me in the comments below.

References

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-36856176

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Signs you need to rethink your hobbies

I love having lots of hobbies and interests, I always have and probably always will for the rest of my life – I just love to try new things. Hobbies are on the whole pretty good for us: they help us to unwind, learn new skills, gain new knowledge, meet new people and make new friends. But what if your hobby starts to become a source of stress?

When I was working on becoming a minimalist I quit a lot of hobbies for various reasons because minimalism isn’t just about reducing how much stuff you have, it’s also about rethinking your whole life and being honest with yourself and what you want. Life is full of beginnings and endings and the same holds true for hobbies – we might go through any number of hobbies or interests in our lifetime or we might keep the same hobby throughout our entire life.

Here are some of the reasons I quit particular hobbies or changed the way I do them:

You aren’t having any fun – Sometimes after many years of enjoying a hobby we fall out of love with it but we haven’t quite moved on and accepted that we feel differently. Remember, hobbies don’t always have to be forever, just because you enjoyed something once doesn’t mean you will enjoy it for the rest of your life. You don’t need to feel obligated to keep doing something if you’ve moved on and no longer enjoy it. If you have many half-finished projects you no longer want to complete, consider selling, donating or recycling the materials.
o Ask yourself what you loved about this hobby when you started and if that is still true today.
It’s costing you too much – Hobbies can be expensive and it’s understandable that we would want to spend our money on them, but sometimes that spending can get out of hand. Some hobbies are actually deliberately designed to make you spend a lot of money – they are fast moving and companies constantly bring out so many new items that it becomes more a game of keeping up or collecting than about the hobby itself. Sometimes hobbies can become expensive because we buy more than we need, or get caught up trying to compete with others and all the tools or equipment they have.
o Ask yourself if you are more focused on spending money on your hobby than you are on actively engaging with it.
It’s competitive, but not in a healthy way – Competition can inspire us to work harder and improve ourselves, but if you find yourself striving for improvement just for the sake of one-upmanship against others its maybe time to reconsider whether what you are doing is actually making you happy. If a hobby makes you feel constantly anxious, disappointed, angry, frustrated or aggressive then it’s time to reconsider what you are getting from your hobby.
o Ask yourself whether your hobby makes you feel positive or negative.
You don’t enjoy the community – Meeting new people and making new friends is always one of the highlights of having a new hobby or interest, but let’s be honest, not all communities are positive ones that lift us up and help us along our journeys. If the groups you are in are full of petty arguments, aggressiveness, fighting and generally don’t make you feel happy or proud to be a part of them then it’s time to exit. Of course if you are feeling really brave you could reinvent the community with a new, more positive group.
o Ask yourself if the community your hobby has is a positive one that helps you, celebrates successes and lifts you up.
You aren’t learning anything new – Hobbies are meant to be fun, but if we aren’t learning anything new, going anywhere new or discovering something new then it’s possible you’ve reached a stale point in your hobby. Part of the fun of a hobby is learning a new skill, improving and discovering new things – give yourself that opportunity.
o Ask yourself if you are learning anything new.
You never finish anything – If you never finish anything it’s possible that you are more in love with the idea of the hobby than the hobby itself. Just because you think something is cool, interesting or a good idea doesn’t necessarily mean you want to go through the journey it takes reach the end of a project or goal, and there’s nothing wrong with that – we can admire and appreciate the effort  it takes to create something without having to do it ourselves.
o Ask yourself if you genuinely enjoy the hobby or whether you are in love with the idea of this hobby.
It was someone else’s idea – Sometimes when people really enjoy their hobbies they want to share them with other people and we agree to try them out because we love those people. Well-meaning friends and family might also think they’ve found something great for us that we’ll really enjoy but if it’s not for you don’t be afraid to try it and then say so.
o Ask yourself if this is something you really enjoy, or is it something others really enjoy.
You’re ignoring your family or other responsibilities – Everyone needs some time out, but if you find yourself obsessed and unwilling to compromise the time you spend on a hobby you need to ask yourself what you are running from. Hobbies can be one way we ‘exit’ relationships or situations that we don’t want to be in, and this can be a helpful coping strategy at times, but in long-rung we need to face our problems head-on and find ways to solve them or reduce their impact on our lives.
o Ask yourself if you are trying to escape from your problems instead of trying to confront them.

How do you feel about your hobbies? Do you still enjoy them or is it time to say goodbye? What hobbies have you had in the past that you let of to allow new ones in? Share with me in the comments below.

How I organize my emails

Following on from my post on how to declutter your digital life, I’m going to be sharing how I organize my emails to stay on top of my inbox. For both personal and work related emails I separate everything I need to keep into different folders. I unsubscribe from all newsletters because I never read them and they just make a mess of my inbox unnecessarily; there is so much content out there to read that I don’t need to be emailed any. I hope this will give you some ideas for how you can organize your own inbox:

Personal emails:

• Accounts – I use this box to store all of those welcome emails when I sign up to something, this way I know exactly who I have given my details too. Occasionally I go through this box and ask myself if there are accounts I am no longer using and then go to the website and delete my account.
• Receipts – As we move more and more towards a digital, paperless life it’s important to put those receipts somewhere safe but not to have them cluttering up our inbox. Again, every so often I go through them and get rid of any from small purchases which have arrived and I had no issues with.
• RescueTime – I’m a big fan of the website and app, RescueTime, each week I get a report telling me how productive I was or how much time I wasted on social media and I put them in here so I can see in a year’s time whether I have improved in how I spend my time on my computer.
• Family/friends – I don’t have this box anymore since I mostly Facebook, text or call my family and friends but if I receive a special email from someone, I’ll put it in here.

Work/academic:

I follow the same pattern as my personal email with an Accounts folders and also a receipts folder but there are also a few others I have to stay organized:
• Dissertation – I’m currently working on my postgraduate thesis so any important information that I need to hold on to, for example about ethics or general guidance is saved here.
• Jobs – Many jobs these days require you to make an account with the companies own online application system, so I separate these from my accounts and put them here. I also keep receipts to say that my application has been received and so on.
• Essay submissions – Still being a student I have to submit essays online so they can be checked for plagiarism, every time I submit I get a receipt which goes in here.
• Volunteering – I volunteer for a couple of organizations so anything related to that goes in here.
• Work – Once I have a job any important information goes in here.
Again, like my personal email I go through each of these boxes periodically to make sure I am not keeping anything unnecessarily. Additionally there will come a time when some boxes are no longer needed, for example when I finish my degree, the ‘dissertation’ and ‘essay submission’ boxes will be deleted.

How do you organize your emails? Do you manage to stay on top of them or do you dread opening your inbox?

Why become a Minimalist

There are many different reasons cited for becoming a minimalist; I have gathered from various websites, blogs and conversations with people a list here which I hope is somewhat comprehensive. I hope you find it useful.

Less stress – Trying to organise, tidy, and clean around lots of items is stressful, it leads to dust and mess and lost items which you cannot find when you need them. Not only that but it’s unnecessary considering how often we actually use the majority of our items.
Cleaning less – Let’s face it, almost no one likes cleaning and this is one reason which seems to resonate with most people who come to the minimalist lifestyle. Less stuff means not only do you have less to clean, but it also makes cleaning easier in general since there are fewer items to clean around.
Desire less – Consumerism is a black hole, the constant production of new items with slightly different modifications creates an endless list of wants and desires that will never be satisfied for the majority of us; in choosing minimalism you choose not to stop wanting objects but to desire less in terms of material objects and wealth and focus on living a good and happy life.
Debt – Some, but not all minimalists join the movement as a way to reign in their spending and become more content with a more simplistic lifestyle which will allow them to free themselves of any existing debt and potential debt in future.
Save money – Cutting back on unnecessary purchases can allow you to save money for other, more important things in life, whatever that is for you.
Travel – A lot of minimalists express the desire to travel and see more of the world, downsizing their possessions and lives allows them to make this a reality, partly because they have fewer possessions to worry about or carry around the world, and secondly because decluttering can also create some much needed money to facilitate travel.
Religion – Whilst some minimalists are religious, minimalism itself is not religious and therefore anyone of any religion, or none at all, can embark upon this journey. For those who are religious they often see it as a way to become closer to God by shedding objects of material wealth.
Family – Whether the desire to spend more time with family or the desire to leave less stress for family when you pass, family is another key reason why people choose minimalism.
Friends – Much like family, many people wish to spend more time with their friends.
Direction – Many people feel they lack direction in their lives and instead give in to mindless consumerism, embracing minimalism gives you the chance for a blank slate and the opportunity to decide what you want to do with your life.

Why did you become a minimalist?

In Real Life: Week 2 Update

Well that’s the end of week 2.

This week I went to the park several times, I saw a bee fly for the first time ever in my life, have watched the pink foxglove in my garden begin to bloom, took a nap because I needed one (I would previously have pushed on through to keep clicking), went for a picnic and watched a live cycling race. It’s funny to think that most of this would never have happened if I hadn’t logged off – I definitely wouldn’t have seen the bee fly for certain, which would have been a great shame because when I spotted it in amongst loads of bees I got really excited and I wasn’t expecting that at all.

I also finished another three books this week and began reading Bleak House, a book which has been on my to-read list for a decade. When I first opened it I struggled with the first page, but I decided to perserve, in the belief that the more I read the easier the book would get, and I was right, I’m now 240 pages in and having very little trouble apart from the odd unfamiliar word. At this pace there is actually hope that I might finish all 1500 books on my to-read list. Unlike before IRL, I have been to the library several times in the past week to either loan or return books.

One downside is that I am feeling the creep of my googling, unfortunately my RescueTime app is having some issues and so it hasn’t been recording my google chrome usage on my mobile. I’m also quite attached to my phone and keep checking it still, despite that there’s no need to. I think this is something I can work on in the following week, especially if I can fix the RescueTime app on my phone. Overall though I think my life is still better than when I was online and I plan to continue as I am.